SCIENCE
21/08/2017 14:06 -03 | Atualizado 21/08/2017 18:48 -03

The Total Solar Eclipse Is Finally Here And The Photos Don't Disappoint

Worth the hype.

Aubrey Gemignani/NASA
The total solar eclipse is seen in Madras, Oregon. 

Unless you’ve been living in a fallout bunker (and who would blame you), everyone should know Monday is the day people around the U.S. have been excited about for the past few months.

Yes, the total solar eclipse has finally arrived.

Photographers across the country captured the phenomenon in various stages with cameras fitted with special filters, along with images of crowds taking in the spectacle. 

Check out the best photos so far of this rare coast-to-coast event below, and we’ll keep updating throughout the day. 

  • Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images
    The Moon is seen as it starts passing in front of the Sun during the solar eclipse August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, North Cascades National Park, Washington.
  • Brian Snyder / Reuters
    A cheerleader uses solar viewing glasses before welcoming guests to the football stadium to watch the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. 
  • IMG_9761
  • Bill Clark via Getty Images
    A news photographer adjusts his telephoto lens equipped with a filter in front of the U.S. Capitol on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in preparation for today's solar eclipse. 
  • NASA via Getty Images
    A composite image, made from seven frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during the solar eclipse. 
  • Brendan McDermid / Reuters
    A man looks through his solar viewing glasses in New York City. 
  • Mike Blake / Reuters
    Depoe Bay, Oregon
  • Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images
    Ross Lake, North Cascades National Park, Washington.
  • Aubrey Gemignani/NASA
    Madras, Oregon. 
  • Mike Blake / Reuters
    People watch the Solar Eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon. 
  • STAN HONDA via Getty Images
    The 'diamond ring effect' is seen during a total solar is seen from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras, Oregon. 
  • Mike Blake / Reuters
    Depoe Bay, Oregon
  • STAN HONDA via Getty Images
    A total solar eclipse is seen from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience in Madras, Oregon. 
  • Mike Blake / Reuters
    Totality in Depoe Bay, Oregon. 
  • PEDRO PARDO via Getty Images
    A Mexican boy looks through a telescope at the beginning of the solar eclipse, at the esplanade of the Museum of Natural History in Mexico City. 
  • PEDRO PARDO via Getty Images
    Mexico City, Mexico. 
  • Aubrey Gemignani/NASA
    The "Bailey's Beads" effect is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun over Madras, Oregon. 
  • Yuri Gripas / Reuters
    Members of the media watch the solar eclipse at the White House. 
  • Kevin Lamarque / Reuters
    Attorney General Jeff Sessions, left, and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross watch from the White House. 
  • Kevin Lamarque / Reuters
    President Donald Trump watches from the Truman Balcony. 
  • George Frey via Getty Images
    The sun is is in full eclipse over Grand Teton National Park outside Jackson, Wyoming. 
  • Marcus Yam via Getty Images
    In-camera multiple exposure of the solar eclipse as seen in Salem, Oregon. 
  • MANDEL NGAN via Getty Images
    Charleston, South Carolina. 
  • RJ Sangosti via Getty Images
    Alliance, Nebraska.
  • Eduardo Munoz / Reuters
    A man takes a look at the solar eclipse at Liberty State Island in New York. 
  • Adrees Latif / Reuters
    Enthusiasts Tanner Person and Josh Blink, both from Vacaville, California,  atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon. 
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